2017 Infiniti Q60 Coupe Review

$38,950

Approval Rating

Mostly neutral rating based on 7 test drives.

$38,950 - $53,300

The average price paid for the 2017 Infiniti Q60 is trending $2,184 below MSRP.

Popularity

Aggregated internet sentiment.

2,7,2,2,2,2,10,7,5,3

Everything you need to know


It’s not perfect, but the Infiniti Q60 is certainly amongst the most stylish executive coupes on the market.

Considering the model Infiniti is perhaps best known for globally is the old G37 Coupe, it’s perhaps unusual that the company’s taken this long to bring back an executive coupe to the range. Still, what’s done is done, and we can only be thankful than there’s now an Infiniti Q60 coupe for us to ogle at. And we don’t use the word ‘ogle’ lightly: for sure, beauty is in the eye of the beholder, but there’s no denying the Infiniti Q60 is a very stylish vehicle that’s adorned with some pretty striking shapes and details. Alas, the Infiniti Q60 overall isn’t quite as impressive as its exterior design flourishes, but it’s still a well-rounded – if perhaps not class-leading – executive mid-sized coupe.

Nicely appointed and practical enough for a coupe


It’s a nicely built cabin that’s befitting of the price tag for the most part.

Considering it’s heavily based on the Infiniti Q50 sedan, the Infiniti Q60 coupe unsurprisingly shares a lot of aspects with the four-door donor car’s interior. That’s to say, it’s a nicely built cabin that’s befitting of the price tag for the most part, though there are some disappointing areas where the quality isn’t quite up to the standards we expect from a nigh-on $40,000 executive coupe. For instance, as with the Q50, the Infiniti Q60’s interior does feature some questionable quality plastics that feel a bit too brittle and scratchy for our liking, and the presence of buttons that can be found on less expensive Nissans is equally disappointing. Still, at least the fit-and-finish is to a very high standard, and it’s worth highlighting that the main contact patches like the seats, steering wheel and controls on the center console are pleasing to the touch. Likewise, the controls are fairly intuitive to operate, with the large dual-screen layout being a notable highlight in this regard. The main displays are also, like the main gauges in the dashboard binnacle, crisp and clear.

Who Buys Infiniti Q60?

Calculations are based on data from KKF, NHTSA and Department of Motor Vehicles using CarBuzz's proprietary algorithm.

Gender

85% men vs 15% women



Ethnicity

Infiniti Q60 Owners vs. US Average

Caucasian +5%
55% Complete
African American +15%
65% Complete
Asian -10%
40% Complete
Hispanic -5%
45% Complete

The front seats are very comfy and supportive, on top of offering good amounts of head and leg room.

Overall space for the driver and passengers is okay by executive coupe standards, if not exactly anything to write home about. Though the front seats are very comfy and supportive, on top of offering good amounts of head and leg room, the same can’t quite be said for the rear seats. Admittedly, rear leg room is actually alright when compared with most rivals, but head room is noticeably limited – thus meaning taller passengers won’t be particularly comfortable in the back. Granted, every mid-sized executive coupe doesn’t offer much head room, and you don’t really buy a car of this ilk for practicality purposes. However, if your budget stretches far enough and you really need a car of this ilk to carry adults about, we’re more inclined to recommend you pay the extra for the more spacious BMW 4 Series Coupe over the Infiniti Q60. Trunk space isn’t particularly impressive, though. Though the space it of a decent size (we were able to fit two small suitcases in the trunk side-by-side with enough room spare to squeeze a duffel bag in), the Infiniti Q60’s capacity of 8.7 cubic feet is fairly disappointing in a class where a capacity in the 10 cubic feet region (as displayed in the Lexus RC, Cadillac ATS Coupe and Mercedes-Benz C-Class Coupe) is about average by segment standards. It’s also telling that, even though the rear seats fold completely flat (though not in a split fashion, sadly), Infiniti isn’t quoting cargo-carrying dimensions for this trunk configuration.

Don’t let the styling fool you: the Infiniti Q60 is more a cruiser than a sports car


Regardless of which version you go for, the Infiniti Q60 will be far more suited to life as a cruising car.

The Infiniti Q60 may have all the suitable aesthetic cues for an edgy and racy sports coupe, but the truth is this executive car isn’t quite a hard-edged performance vehicle. Regardless of which version you go for, the Infiniti Q60 will be far more suited to life as a cruising car rather than a tool for keen driving enthusiasts to get excited over. It is worth stressing the point that this doesn’t make the Infiniti Q60 an unengaging vehicle to drive. On the contrary, it’s actually fairly good (if not amazing) in this regard. The steering offers precise inputs, overall forward visibility is satisfactory, body lean is decently controlled when cornering and there’s a decent amount of grip to lean on when holding a line through a bend. However, if it’s outright thrills you’re after in this class, a Cadillac ATS Coupe or BMW 4 Series will be more appropriate for your needs.

Sadly, there is one notable downside: the rear visibility.

A similar story can be said for the ride comfort and refinement levels. Whilst we don’t feel those aspects are quite up to the standards set by the Mercedes-Benz C-Class Coupe, the Infiniti Q60 does nevertheless do an admirable job at isolating the driver and passengers from intrusions like wind noise, tire roar and the more severe lumps and bumps in the road surface. If you’ll primarily be driving your coupe on open stretches of road, the Infiniti Q60 makes a pretty convincing case for itself. Sadly, there is one notable downside: the rear visibility. Though this is again a quirk that affects pretty much every coupe on the market right now, it is worth pointing out that the combination of chunky rear pillars and a narrow rear window does make keeping on top of what’s going on behind you notably difficult. The fact blind spot monitoring systems are optional extras (unless you go for the base model, which can’t be fitted with them at all) also doesn’t really help the Infiniti Q60 in this area.

The base engine is fine, but you’ll likely be more tempted by the larger six-cylinder options


We reckon the six-cylinder gasoline engines will be more appealing to more buyers.

In our review of the Infiniti Q50 sedan, we did state the base 2.0-liter turbocharged four-cylinder gasoline engine is a suitable companion for the executive car. For sure, with 208-hp and 258 lb-ft of torque, it’s no real powerhouse of an engine, but the 2.0-liter is a smooth and fairly refined choice that compensates for its lack of outright horsepower oomph with a decent spread of torque across the rev range. The good-if-not-exactly-amazing fuel economy of 22mpg city/30mpg highway or 21mpg city/28mpg highway, depending on whether you stick with the standard rear-wheel drive setup or spend $2,000 on the optional all-wheel drive system, is also noticeably better than what the rest of the engines in the Infiniti Q60 range can provide. However, as the Infiniti Q60 is positioned further up the executive car pecking order and has a more image-conscious vibe going for it, we reckon the six-cylinder gasoline engines will be more appealing to more buyers. Though the 2.0-liter unit is still a good all-rounder, there’s no denying the six-cylinder option is a far smoother and punchier engine that, thanks to its brawnier characteristics, does suit the Infiniti Q60’s more cruiser-oriented character rather well.

Regardless of which engine you do end up selecting, your Infiniti Q60 will only be available with a seven-speed automatic transmission.

Further making the six-cylinder option more appealing is the fact it’s available in two configurations: a ‘base’ version with 300-hp and 295 lb-ft of torque to play with, or a more potent version with 400-hp and 350 lb-ft that’s exclusively available in the range-topping ‘Red Sport’ trim. Being very similar iterations of the same base engine, there’s not really much to separate them in terms of fuel economy (both versions return 19mpg in the city, irrespective of how many wheels are being driven, and the 400-hp’s 26mpg in all-wheel drive and 27mpg in rear-wheel drive formats are only one miles-per-gallon down on what the 300-hp unit can muster), so there’s very little holding you back if you can stomach the Red Sport’s $7,000 premium over the lesser six-cylinder model. Then again, the 300-hp version does make a valid case for itself. After all, $7,000 is a lot of money to spend on a more powerful engine option, and it’s not like those extra power gains will be immediately noticeable in day-to-day driving conditions. Plus, the Red Sport’s power outputs put the Infiniti Q60 in a class of car that’s dominated by sportier executive coupe variants that the Infiniti can’t quite match dynamically, thus further accentuating the 300-hp six-cylinder’s status as the potential sweet spot in the Infiniti Q60 range. Regardless of which engine you do end up selecting, your Infiniti Q60 will only be available with a seven-speed automatic transmission that you can also manually override using the shifter paddles behind the steering wheel. On the whole, the transmission is a good one that gets the job smoothly and efficiently enough, but those who are accustomed to how automatics from rival companies to operate (mainly BMW, Audi and Mercedes-Benz) will perhaps be disappointed by the fact the Infiniti Q60’s gearbox doesn’t change gears as smoothly or as quickly (though does, to its credit, do a very good job at selecting the optimum gear when you leave it be).

Reasonably priced, but the Infiniti Q60 has an unusual options scheme


If your budget can extend far enough, then we’d definitely recommend you ignore the entry level Infiniti Q60, and instead concentrate on the versions marked as ‘Premium’.

Most premium cars only really come into their stride equipment-wise once you start looking at any trim higher than the base spec. and the Infiniti Q60 is no exception to that rule. If your budget can extend far enough, then we’d definitely recommend you ignore the entry level Infiniti Q60, and instead concentrate on the versions marked as ‘Premium’. That’s not to say the Infiniti Q60 is particularly sparse on equipment per se. On the contrary, in comparison with rival cars, the Infiniti does come with a decent array of features as standard, ranging from expected gear like a reversing camera and dual-zone climate control, to less common convenience gubbins such as keyless entry. However, the fact no optional packages are available means you’re stuck with that specification – which, considering the most basic Infiniti Q60 has a base price just shy of $39,000, isn’t something we can see most buyers putting up with. Depending on your mindset, the Infiniti Q60 in $41,300 ‘Premium’ trim could either be a far more desirable ownership prospect, or a vehicle with a peculiar optional equipment specification plan. On the upside, the new standard feature spec includes everything from the prior base trim on top of a premium audio system and HD radio; sadly, it’s not available on 400-hp Infiniti Q60s and, due to the staggered options scheme that requires you to specify features in succession, you can potentially spend a lot of money just to get certain items. For instance, though leather upholstery is officially priced at $1,350, it’s actually $4,350 because you need to have the $3,000 Premium Plus Package (which adds heated front seats, a power-adjustable steering column and built-in navigation, to name but a few features). Likewise, you’ll need the leather seats and the Premium Plus extra installed before being able to specify the blind spot warning, emergency autonomous braking and front and rear parking sensors featured in the $2.250 Driver Assistance Package.

The warranties are also surprisingly good on the Infiniti Q60, with the four-years/60,000-miles bumper-to-bumper and six-years/70,000-miles being fairly generous by class standards.

Admittedly, if you go for all the options on the Premium spec, you do still end up with a car that’s competitively priced if you’re cross-examining a fully-loaded Premium-spec Infiniti Q60 against the BMW 4 Series Coupe and Mercedes-Benz C-Class Coupe. However, the Infiniti Q60 doesn’t come across as good value when you compare it with the more affordable competition: like-for-like examples of the Cadillac ATS Coupe and Lexus RC can be bought for significantly less money than the Infiniti Q60. Of course, the flagship ‘Red Sport’ trim was never going to offer value for money, but it again is decently equipped for a vehicle with a base price of $51,300: leather upholstery, power-adjustment for the front seats (which also includes powered adjustment for the side bolsters on the driver’s seat), 19-inch forged alloy wheels and adaptive suspension. However, there are some unusual omissions, with perhaps the big offender being the return of the Premium Plus and Driver Assistance packages – meaning, if you want blind spot monitoring, built-in navigation, parking sensors and rain sensing windshield wipers on your 400-hp Infiniti Q60, you’ll need to pay a whopping $5,500 extra. Still, at least the safety rating for the Infiniti Q60 is pretty good. Though there haven’t been any published crash test results at time of writing, the Infiniti Q50 sedan that shares a lot of the core mechanical bits with the Q60 was awarded the full five stars in its most recent NHTSA crash test, so the array of safety gear on the Infiniti Q60 should mean business as usual in this regard. The warranties are also surprisingly good on the Infiniti Q60, with the four-years/60,000-miles bumper-to-bumper and six-years/70,000-miles being fairly generous by class standards. Alas, as the Infiniti Q60 is a new car, we can’t quite predict how much of its value will be retained when you sell the car on.

Not the obvious or easiest-to-recommend option, but still a pleasant coupe cruiser


Let’s be honest: the Infiniti Q60 isn’t a class-leading executive coupe. Though it does a very admirable job at bridging the gap between the more affordable premium offerings and the pricier options provided by the perennially dominant German marques, the honest truth is it doesn’t do a totally successful job at delivering a knock-out blow to either side of the market. That’s not to say the Infiniti Q60 is a hopelessly outclassed machine that shouldn’t be on your radar. On the contrary, there’s a lot that it does rather well, and especially so if you’re after a more refined and laid back driving experience. Which, we feel, is something that a lot of people will find very appealing, even though the Infiniti Q60’s edgier styling cues and the presence of a 400-hp engine in the line-up are perhaps a little bit at odds with those traits. Put simply, we wouldn’t implore you to put the Infiniti Q60 at the top of your executive coupe shortlist. However, if you’re in the market for such a car, we still reckon you should at least consider the Infiniti Q60 instead of writing it off on the basis that it doesn’t objectively trump the competition.