2017 Ford Fusion Review

$22,610

Approval Rating

Mostly neutral rating based on 38 test drives.

$22,610 - $38,740

The average price paid for the 2017 Ford Fusion is trending $563 below MSRP.

Popularity

Aggregated internet sentiment.

7,7,7,7,8,9,10,8,7,0

Everything you need to know


An extensive model range makes the Ford Fusion a good option in the mid-size sedan market.

The Ford Fusion offers a good option for potential buyers in this segment of the market. It has to be good because the rivals also offer some good models like the Chevrolet Malibu, the Honda Accord and the Volkswagen Passat. The automaker has made the Ford Fusion accessible to many thanks to having no less than twelve models wearing the nameplate with the entry-level Fusion S starting off with an MSRP of $22,120 and ending at the tech-packed hybrid-powered Fusion Energi Platinum at $39,120, making it one of the segment leaders.

The mid-life refresh sees a great new interior for the Ford Fusion


The refresh added two more trim level options - Platinum and Sport.

Over and above the trims already in play, the refresh added two more trim level options - Platinum and Sport. While the entry model S has good standard features, it’s still the bottom of the range, but that doesn’t mean it’s a bad option, more like it’s an option for someone in the market who has a smaller budget. The best trim available would be the Platinum. Inside you have the immediate impression of quality; the materials look and feel good purely because they are. In the Ford Fusion Platinum we find a leather wrapped steering wheel, instrument panel and door trims while the stylish power adjustable (up front) seats are also leather covered with a diamond-stitching pattern that have taken the Ford to a new level. This all makes for an interior that’s a rather nice place to be, the new upgrades have made a very good car even better. The gear selector has been replaced with a rotary selector knob as seen in the likes of Jaguar, this frees up storage space in the center console and leaves a less complicated area with better access. There are cup holders that will take average sized cans or bottles and there’s a separate section dedicated to phone storage. Gauge cluster is digital and has a great layout, flanking the speedometer on either side are screens that relay drive and car information back to the driver with the left side being able to change between a few different displays. Depending on what information you want to see there’s consumption figures, a tachometer and speed information. On the hybrid there’s a screen that will teach you to drive with better fuel economy, along with a guide to show where energy is being used and how to manage it more efficiently.

Who Buys Ford Fusion?

Calculations are based on data from KKF, NHTSA and Department of Motor Vehicles using CarBuzz's proprietary algorithm.

Gender

0% men vs 100% women



Ethnicity

Ford Fusion Owners vs. US Average

Caucasian 0%
50% Complete
African American 0%
50% Complete
Asian 0%
50% Complete
Hispanic 0%
50% Complete

The Ford Fusion shares the same platform as the Ford Edge crossover.

There’s similar space to other mid-size sedans on the market, which brings us to but one complaint, the rear seating space isn’t as big. Three adults in the rear will be a tight fit, but for two it will be more acceptable. The base platform is getting older now so for the next one we’ll likely see more rear space. Besides the door panels, there is also space for two average-sized gym water bottles in the fold down center of the rear seats. Trunk opens by remote and has a low load edge making loading easier than in the competition, seats have a 60/40 split for large items, but without extending the space there’s 16 cubic feet available, slightly up from the rivals which seem to average around 15.8. For the hybrid models you need to remember that the battery packs take up trunk space thanks to the car not being built on a dedicated hybrid platform. The Ford Fusion shares the same platform as the Ford Edge crossover, so if you want something like the Fusion with a taller ride height and a little more space, then that’s something to take a look at.

As one of the most popular mid-size sedans you can expect a brilliant drive, and the Ford Fusion does not disappoint


The Ford Fusion feels really good on the road, be it in the city or on the highway.

The Ford Fusion feels really good on the road, be it in the city or on the highway, or just about anywhere you can find smooth roads to drive on. The base models with the 2.5-liter four-cylinder gasoline engine do well, as do the rest of the engines in the range. The most commonly chosen version is the 2.0-liter turbocharged four-cylinder gasoline engine, which makes sense as it offers up a quick and responsive feel and drive, and combined with the nice and direct steering makes for good handling too. While it’s not a sport engine, it does perform with a lot of confidence and has more than enough power on tap to carry around the sizeable body. The engine works best when combined with the front-wheel drive transmission, but the optional all-wheel drive version is most likely better had when mated to the engine found in the other new trim option in the Ford Fusion range, the Fusion Sport’s 2.7-liter six-cylinder gasoline – a model that can only be had with a the all-wheel drive, so even Ford knows that makes sense. As the name suggests, this is the version of the Ford Fusion you need to take if you’re after good performance and a properly sporty drive as that definitely lives up to the badge.

Ford claims the hybrids can run on electric power up to a speed of 85 mph.

Then there are the hybrid models, the Hybrid Platinum and the Fusion Energi Platinum. Both have good power figures and decent performance and they offer up a good, smooth drive that makes little noise besides some mechanical whine that’s not always noticed. While the hybrid models perform well, they are just a little slower off the line thanks to using the electric motor for the initial pull off before switching over to the gasoline powerplant. Ford claims the hybrids can run on electric power up to a speed of 85 mph, but this is hard to get right although a few weeks behind the wheel may see this happen. Hard acceleration gives that rubber banding common to continuously variable transmissions (CVT) which both hybrids are fitted with, but it’s not really enough to annoy you, and of course, the hybrid models aren’t about performance but instead for fuel consumption and saving the environment. While we don’t like a CVT transmission, they do work well in the Fusion models. Other models can be had with a six-speed automatic transmission with optional paddle shifters or the CVT but sadly there is no manual option.

With twelve models in the Ford Fusion range, there needs to be a good spread of engines


The range starts off with a 175-hp 2.5-liter four-cylinder gasoline engine.

The 12-model Ford Fusion range features something for everyone; just about all budgets and needs are catered for which is probably one of the reasons that the mid-size sedan can be classed as a segment leader. The range starts off with a 175-hp 2.5-liter four-cylinder gasoline engine, up from that there’s a more powerful but smaller capacity 181-hp 1.5-liter turbocharged four-cylinder turbocharged gasoline engine. The most popular one follows, the turbocharged 2.0-liter four-cylinder with a very usable 245-hp available. The new Ford Fusion Sport lives up to the name thanks to a powerful V6 EcoBoost engine measuring in at 2.7-liters with 325 horsepower. All of them are gasoline powered. The hybrid models have two engines, the first being a 2.0-liter four-cylinder gasoline with a combined output of 181-hp along with a plug-in version with the same power.

While we don’t like a CVT transmission, they do work well in the Fusion models.

Then there are the hybrid models, the Hybrid Platinum and the Fusion Energi Platinum. Both have good power figures and decent performance and they offer up a good, smooth drive that makes little noise besides some mechanical whine that’s not always noticed. While the hybrid models perform well, they are just a little slower off the line thanks to using the electric motor for the initial pull off before switching over to the gasoline powerplant. Ford claims the hybrids can run on electric power up to a speed of 85 mph, but this is hard to get right although a few weeks behind the wheel may see this happen. Hard acceleration gives that rubber banding common to continuously variable transmissions (CVT) which both hybrids are fitted with, but it’s not really enough to annoy you, and of course, the hybrid models aren’t about performance but instead for fuel consumption and saving the environment. While we don’t like a CVT transmission, they do work well in the Fusion models. Other models can be had with a six-speed automatic transmission with optional paddle shifters or the CVT but sadly there is no manual option.

When a car is billed as one of the best in the segment, you can be assured there’s plenty of features and good safety


One of the best parts about the refreshed Ford Fusion is the inclusion of Ford’s latest operating system, Sync 3.

One of the best parts about the refreshed Ford Fusion is the inclusion of Ford’s latest operating system, Sync 3. The new Sync3 replaces the MyTouch system and while that was an ok, if not a little buggy system, Sync3 is miles ahead in just about every way possible, in particular with the interface and clarity. Sync3 is headed up with a crystal clear, full color touch screen that can also be operated via the steering-mounted controls as well as with voice activation. The intuitiveness of the system and the functionality makes it one of the best out there, comparable with cars that are much higher up in the spec and price range. The Fusion models higher in the range feature Android Auto and Apple CarPlay along with a 12-speaker Sony audio system.

The top spec Ford Fusion models can easily rival the German sedan offerings and even Ford’s own luxury brand, Lincoln.

Some features are more suited to a luxury car, like dual zone climate control and heated and cooled seats. Tech and driver assist features include adaptive cruise control; pre-collision assist, pedestrian protection and lane-keep assist (which van be turned off as it can get quite annoying), voice activated navigation and a power moonroof. The park assist is all-new and helps park in both parallel and perpendicular situations. We also like the driver alert that monitors for drowsiness. The top spec Ford Fusion models can easily rival the German sedan offerings and even Ford’s own luxury brand, Lincoln. It’s safe as houses for the Ford Fusion with top marks and a 2017 safety pick from the Insurance Institute of Highway Safety. The only place the Ford Fusion had an issue was with the headlights, here they scored as “poor” strangely.

The Ford Fusion is one of the best options in the segment and must tested before making a decision


If you’re looking for a very good family sedan then the Ford Fusion is the car for you. As said, the extensive model line-up means there’s a Fusion available to suit just about every need and budget, something few automakers can claim. The Honda Accord, Toyota Camry and Chevrolet Malibu all have a similar base price too, but the Fusion seems to offer more. More interesting is that the Ford Fusion Platinum can spar with the Lincoln MKZ from Ford’s luxury brand, a car that is essentially a heavily rebadged and restyled Ford Fusion on the same platform.There is a reason the Ford Fusion is doing so well in the market, you’d be doing yourself an injustice if you didn’t closely examine the range before buying in this segment.